Urinary problems

Urinary problems Urinary Incontinence – Dogs “Urine leakage” is a common condition which is usually seen in older animals and especially female dogs due to anatomical differences. The bladder stretches like a balloon as it fills up and normally a sphincter acts like a stopper to prevent urine leaking from the bladder. Owners often come…

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Kidney disorders

Kidney disorders Kidney Failure As with humans, as cats get older their bodies start to wear out and things can go wrong. In cats, one of the most common organs to fail is the kidneys. Originally cats were desert animals so their kidneys are designed to make very concentrated urine to save precious water. In…

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Mobility

Mobility Arthritis – dogs Is your dog “showing his age”? If so, try this simple test. Compared to several years ago is your dog: slower to get up after lying down? having problems with jumping in and out of the car or climbing stairs? less keen to exercise? Tiring more easily? showing any signs of…

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Caninsulin

Caninsulin Diabetes Mellitus – Dogs Diabetes Mellitus is the most common hormonal problem we see in dogs. As in humans, the disease arises when the cells in the pancreas fail to produce the hormone “Insulin” when our dog eats something. After eating, glucose travels from the intestines into the blood and normally triggers the pancreas…

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Diet and nutrition advice for your rabbit

Diet and nutrition advice for your rabbit One of the major contributing factors for illnesses in rabbits is poor feeding regimes. Rabbits are herbivores and need a nutritious, balanced and interesting diet. We recommend a feeding ratio of the following: 80% roughage 15% greens 5% pellets Coloured fruit and vegetables such as carrot or apple…

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Dental Care for rabbits

Dental Care for rabbits Dental problems in rabbits are quite common. The majority of people are aware that rabbits have four large incisors (front teeth) but you may not realise that behind their upper incisors are two tiny incisors. These are know as the peg teeth. Rabbits also have six upper and five lower molars…

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Advice on neutering your rabbit

Advice on neutering your rabbit Neutering pet rabbits is now a common operation. Neutering stops rabbits getting nasty diseases such as uterine cancer in females and testicular cancer in males. Neutering also reduces the chances of aggression and allows males and females to live together without the risk of babies! They will make better pets…

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Microchipping your pet rabbit

Microchipping your pet rabbit Pet rabbits – whether indoor or outdoor – are just as likely as dogs or cats to escape into the big unknown which is why it is important to microchip your rabbit. Your rabbit cannot wear a collar so a microchip is the only form of identification a rabbit can have.…

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Advice on Flystrike

Advice on Flystrike “Fly strike” can be a fatal disease as it develops rapidly. It is primarily associated with domestic rabbits throughout the warmer months. If you are concerned that your rabbit is showing signs of it, you need to take immediate action. Flies are attracted to the smell of urine and faeces around a…

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